The Linus Project
ELA grade 8

Tasks included:
detailed Linus Project essay
Lawrence Kohlberg essay
"screenplay"
press release
daily journal
five captioned Peanuts cartoons





Linus Project graphic Organizer

The Linus Project started on December 24th, 1995. That day, an article titled “Joy to the World” appeared in Parade Magazine. This article was written by Pultizer Prize winner, Eddie Adams. This article featured a petite, downy hairy child who had been a victim of cancer. This sick girl mentioned that her security blanket helped her get through her rough time. Karen Loucks, after reading the article motivated herself to provide security blankets to Denver’s Rocky Mountain Children’s Cancer Center. Because Mrs. Loucks had a heart, the Linus Project was born. Project Linus has two main purposes. The united chapters would like to provide love, security, warmth and comfort to children who need it the most. All blankets are made and/or provided by volunteers called “blanketeers.” Project Linus’ second mission is to provide a fun and satisfying activity for those who are altruistic. The Linus Project is still alive and well. There are chapters that dot our map across the nation. Volunteers crochet, knit and sew, no blanket is store bought. Blankets are shipped to children in hospitals, homeless shelters, and even Afghanistan. The Linus Project will live on as long as people stay altruistic and willing. Volunteering for the Linus Project is not hard to do and can become rewarding and fun. As long as volunteers are still willing, there is always a way. No hand is turned down to help.

The Linus Project
On December 24th, 1995, altruism was caught at it's finest. In Parade Magazine, an article called "Joy To The World" by
Eddie Adams was published. "Joy To The World" featured a petite girl that was in the middle of her chemotherapy. Eddie Adams reported that in the girl's interview she had said her security blanket helped her to get through her less than desirable times. The small girl said that her blanket made her think that no matter what, everything would be okay. This story led on and Parade Magazine was put in the hands of Karen Loucks. She read about this little girl's battle and felt so motivated to help children like this little girl. Soon after, Karen Loucks had made and donated security blankets to Denver's Rocky Mountain Children's Cancer Center. By Mrs. Loucks altruism, a writer's story, a little girl's life and a cartoon character with a blanket, the Linus Project was born.
"The Linus Project is a giving organization and everyone involved receives impact that could not received without
love and altruism."* The leaders of The Linus Project have two main purposes. They would like to provide comfort in the form of blankets to children who need comfort the most. The Linus Project also has a purpose for the volunteers or
"blanketeers" who make and deliver the blankets. Sometimes the volunteers need something to do in order to keep
them out of harm's way and trouble. Others just volunteer for The Linus Project to watch the person receiving the gift
be thankful for everything that volunteer has done. In our nation, we as Americans are greedy most of he time. We
cannot have things fast enough or good enough to make us happy, but when hardships come, Americans become
humble and it is then we realize that everything is a reason to be thankful. The Linus Project is a great organization
that humbles and provides comfort to all those who need it.
The Linus Project is most definitely not a dead organization. There are chapters that dot the map of our nation in
every state. "Blanketeers" provide their hands, money, time and love to "The Linus Project. Volunteers may knit,
crochet, or sew the blankets at their respective chapters and deliver the blankets on a scheduled date." Everyone
involved in The Linus Project is affected by the love and joy that both volunteers and receivers have for one another. It
is remarkable how one simple magazine article can impact a nation and even a world. Volunteers have shipped
blankets to hospitals, homeless shelters, churches and even as far as Afghanistan. As long as people are willing to
devote themselves to The Linus Project, it will live on. http://www.humbolditowahistory.org/linus.htm
quote 1= *
http://www.projectlinus.org/about.html
quote 2=

http://www.projectlinusnashville.org/history.htm
quote 3*

http://www.sonomacountyhabitat.org/about_us/news.php?ID=88
http://www.newsandobserver.com/news/story/544539.htmNote: I only put websites up that were most relevant to my piece. If you would like the other sites, please let me know.



Daily Journal

January 23, 2009

Our class has just begun with our Linus Projects. We picked our blankets and spools of yarn and Ms. McFadden told us all about what the Linus Project is and what it does for people. To our class, this “Linus Project” are just another set of tasks that our teacher is using to make us stronger writers.

January 26, 2009

My class is frustrated with crocheting and it is just the first day. Nobody knows what they are doing except for Ms. McFadden and Elizabeth. I know we will all understand things soon, but I just wish everyone would cool down. We are all so used to learning things with just one pass. We are usually taught something and we understand the material perfectly and demonstrate it perfectly. Now that we have something to challenge us, we have our tempers in an uproar and we are all ready to give up on this project!

February 11, 2009
My classmates and I are all getting stressed out. Ms. McFadden has been gracious and extended our due date, but we all are still confused because our computer skills information is still new. All of us are finished with our blankets, so our worries a week ago are not the worries for this week. We are losing sight of how altruistic Ms. McFadden is making us, and it is plain sight that we have to get out good grade. These next few days will make or break our grades.
February 12, 2009
Most of my classmates are almost finished with their projects! Maybe it's just me that's behind! I have so many questions I should have asked earlier. I spent too much time and my blanket, and not enough time on my tasks. Procrastination has set in and I am about to feel the sting of it this weekend. I have no idea I am going to get all this done. I should have been working up to getting it finished instead of starting the week before it was due. Right now, I am on shaky ground!
February 13, 2009
I am of course still scared about how I am going to get everything done. I know I won't procrastinate again. My tasks are a mess and it is not because I don't understand them, they are just going to seem rushed and she gave extra time. Because Ms. McFadden gave our class extra days to finish the project, she will probably grade harder. Yikes! Remind me to never do this again!----

http://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=pMVpzCqfVxOLyCmCyUDnyNa&hl=en
take my survey!!!!!!!

Peanuts - January 25, 2009
Peanuts - January 25, 2009
Classic Peanuts by Schulz is a great example of Hurricane Katrina written in cartoon form. Linus is a symbol of all the victims of Hurricane Katrina. Linus' blankets represents the victim's homes and all their belongings. Lucy is an example of Hurricane Katrina ripping her victims' comfort away from them. Linus reacted like Hurricane Katrina's victims. He spoke to anyone that would listen, and tried to persuade Lucy to give his blanket like Katrina's victims tried to beg and persuade in order to regain their belongings. Soon after, Linus retaliated by stealing his blanket and reminding himself of how successful he was. Just as Linus, Katrina victims acted on putting thier lives back together and the victims are living to tell about it.

Peanuts - July 18, 2008
Peanuts - July 18, 2008
In this cartoon, Lucy is trying to break Linus of his blanket habit. We find out in this cartoon through personification that Linus values his blanket as a person rather than a thing.

Peanuts - September 21, 2008
Peanuts - September 21, 2008
Here, Snoopy is comically sneaky when he takes Linus' blanket. Linus is distraught without his blanket and is warning whoever took his blanket. In this cartoon, we see definite separation anxiety between Linus and his blanket.

Peanuts - January 7, 2009
Peanuts - January 7, 2009
In this cartoon, the reader can see the impact of Linus' blanket. He is distraught and cannot sleep because he has lost his comfort. This loss of comfort that Linus is displaying is the main reason the Mrs. Loucks started the Linus Project in the first place. This cartoon is a prototype of why The Linus Project is named after Linus Van Pelt.

Peanuts - July 15, 2008
Peanuts - July 15, 2008
In this Classic Peanuts, Linus is faced with bullies. He quickly uses his blanket to retaliate and he the bullies run. Because Linus' security blanket helped him against the bullies, this may be the reason he has difficulty parting with it.----


Local Youth Makes Difference graphic organzier
Sanford, North, Carolina- Usually in a middle school, you find children just trying to make good grades and advance to the next grade. This is especially true for eighth graders because eighth grade students advance to high school. In a language arts class, one would usually find children groaning and asleep, but not in Ms. Cynthia McFadden's class at West Lee Middle School. She states that:"My class is not just language arts, it is a class that makes the students better in everything." This is especially true for this eighth grade resource class' latest task, The Linus Project. With the Linus Project, participants make blankets and do various written tasks that will answer the "why" to all students wondering. Some students were willing and accepting of The Linus Project especially Catherine Utley who says: " I love helping people, it's what I want to do in life." The feeling was not mutual for everyone, just ask Evans Stephenson who asks: "why do we have to do this anyway?" One thing is universal, all students had to complete the project. Joseph Adcock says: " I don't like crocheting, but we have to do it." Ms. McFadden's eighth grade will be sending their finished blankets to the local assisted care unit. The class' computer tech tells the college bound class: "The Linus Project looks great on transcripts!" So for anyone who had lost hope on tomorrow's decision makers, here is a class that is destined for greatness. ----
Local Youth Makes Difference
Sanford, North, Carolina- Usually in a middle school, you find children just trying to make good scores and advance to the next grade. This is especially true for eighth graders because eighth grade students advance to high school. In a language arts class, one would usually find children groaning and asleep, but not in Ms. Cynthia McFadden's class at West Lee Middle School.She states that:"My class is not just language arts, it is a class that makes the students better in everything." This is especially true for this eighth grade resource class' latest task, The Linus Project.With the Linus Project, participants make blankets and do various written tasks that will answer the "why" to all students wondering the reasoning behind it. Some students were willing and accepting of The Linus Project especially Catherine Utley who says: " I love helping people, it's what I want to do in life." The feeling was not mutual for everyone, just ask Evans Stephenson who asks: "why do we have to do this anyway?" One thing is universal, all students had to complete the project. Joseph Adcock says: " I don't like crocheting, but we have to do it." Ms. McFadden's eighth grade will be sending their finished blankets to the local assisted care unit. The class' computer tech tells the college bound class: "The Linus Project looks great on transcripts!"So for anyone who had lost hope on tomorrow's decision makers, here is a class that is destined for greatness.

Quote one: Ms.Mcfadden (2-4-09)
Quote two: Catherine Utley (2-5-09)
Quote three: Evans Stephenson (2-2-09)
Quote four: Joseph Adcock (2-12-09)
Quote five: Danita Russel (2-2-09)----


A Just Because: Crocheting Screenplay
Setting: Lights come up on a small classroom
Teacher: Ok class, today we are going to make blankets!
Students in unison: WHAT?*
Teacher: Yes, but calm down!
(Students bombard teacher with questions on how to make a blanket)
Teacher: Children, quiet! I will teach you exactly how if you will calm down for five minutes!
(Teacher, not used to screaming calms herself down. Children run back to seats and sit quietly)
Teacher: Now this is how I have taught to act properly. We will be making blankets, (teacher cringes for complaints, but there are none) but first let me tell you about why we are making the blankets. Has anyone ever heard of The Linus Project?
(Students all nod their heads no)
Teacher: Well, you will be a part of it by the end of this project. The Linus Project is based out of Atlanta, Georgia and makes blankets and comfort for people who need it the most. Does anyone know what altruism is?
(Students nod their their heads no again)
Teacher: Altruism is giving to people and getting nothing in return.* You will be displaying altruism by making blankets for the elderly. Now go by rows and get a blanket, yarn, and your crocheting tool.
(Students orderly receive their materials.)(Just as the teacher is about to show the students how to get started the bell rings signaling the end of class)
Teacher: Oh, never mind we will have to pick up tomorrow.
(Lights go down. Lights return with same set, but actors with different clothes signifying a new day.)
Student: Mrs., I can't do this!

Teacher: You'll get it.It will just take some time, you guys are one pass learners and you get frustrated when you can't get something on the first pass.*(teacher chuckles)
Student: I got it!* It wasn't that bad. Definitely easier than I thought.
(Students watched and worked on their blankets quietly as lights dim. Faces on students stay firm looking concentrated.)
(Lights come up on rest home. Students enter from right wing with finished blankets in hand. Teacher is in the back with clipboard counting heads.)
Student: Wow, how many times did you go around?
Student with best blanket:( says line with smile) Six, I got bored this weekend!

(students look at girl's blanket wide-eyed)(Students move in line towards stage left revealing elderly people)
Elderly lady: Look Earl, these kids are here to see us! How sweet!
Teacher: My name is Mrs. Smith and this is my sixth grade class, we have made blankets to give to you.
Elderly man: Isn't that just darlin'! How long did it take ya'll to make these?
Student: Two long (hold out long until hit by other student signaling you to finish your sentence) weeks. (Smile charmingly)
Elderly lady: Well how thoughtful you young people are! You know, we have never had any visitors!
Elderly man: And we ain't ever got anything from anybody!
Elderly lady: You all are a blessing.
Teacher: Thank-you! My students have worked very hard to make these for you. Unfortunately, we don't have much time, so we have to drop these off and go.
(Students lay their blankets on foot of the different beds.)
Elderly couple in unison: Well, we thank you for coming by anyway.
Students in unison: Thank-you for letting us make these for you.
Elderly lady: Come back anytime!
Teacher: Oh, don't worry we will!
(Students walk stage right and lights dim out of elderly home.)
Student: Those people really were happy to see us and they were proud of our blankets.
Teacher: Yes, they sure were. You guys really made a difference.
* THE END----
Quote one: the whole class (1-23-09)
Quote two: Evans Stephenson (2-2-09)
Quote three: Ms. McFadden (1-23-09)
Quote four: Haily Mundy (2-5-09)
Quote five: Barbara Graham (2-11-09)--------
Lawrence Kohlberg- graphic organizer
Lawrence Kohlberg was born in Bronxville, New York, in 1927. He received both his bachelors and masters degree
from the University of Chicago. Lawrence Kohlberg worked at both Yale and Harvard during his life. He was an amazing
professor at these school and redefined his craft. Kohlberg was an amazing student, professor, and physicist. He is one
of the best poster children for the saying "knowledge is power." Lawrence Kohlberg is proof that if you work hard in

school, you can reach what you want and become famous for it. Kohlberg is most famous for his stages of moral
development. He devoted most of his life to this project, so he knew the project was going to make him famous.
Kohlberg studies boys from age seven through their adolescence and asked them moral questions and documented how
the boys replied. One of his more famous questions to ask was "whether the husband of a critically ill woman is
justified in stealing a drug that could save her life if the pharmacist is charging much more than he can afford to pay."
Kohlberg did not look much into the answer, but the reasoning behind the answers to the questions he asked. Because
he thought this way, Kohlberg's findings were much more in depth and found to be more accurate. He had three main
stages: preconventional, conventional, and postconventional. Preconvential is the easiest stage to understand.
Therefore, Kohlberg's test boys were in this stage when the boys were young. This stage explains that people that are
preconventional do right only when they know they will get punished. They are typically only worried about their needs
and wants, and no one else's. In this stage, people are sore afraid of punishment. In the conventional stage, Kohlberg
found self pride was included in whether someone does right or wrong. People believe they are morally correct when

they follow the rules and consider themselves good when they live up to what is expected of them. They would rather
avoided blame is more ethical than getting a reward. The pull of society has a bigger impact on people than the law
itself. The last stage is postcoventional. Most people do not reach this stage because it is morally demanding. People
start to realize the law is not always right and that whether we have an award or not, we do something for the greater
good. It is basically doing good and getting nothing or persecution in return. It takes a humble person to do something
just for the greater good. As a society, we roll out the red carpet and make people feel like celebrities with accolades,
and that is the main purpose why most people do good. In this stage, you would have to be a person who was self-
grounded and self-controlled. Our class partook in The Linus Project and I think my whole class is conventional. I think
we did it because it would look good on our transcripts and maybe we would get comments. We mostly did it because
we had too. It was a grade we had to make. There are some chapters in the nation that are postconventional in their
work and some of our class may join a chapter and devote their time and energy to The Linus Project and become
postcoventional, but at this point in our lives, we are only conventional.


Lawrence Kohlberg
Lawrence Kohlberg was born in Bronxville, New York, in 1927. He received both his bachelors and masters degree from the University of Chicago. Lawrence Kohlberg worked at both Yale and Harvard during his life. He was an amazing professor at these school and redefined his craft. Kohlberg was an amazing student, professor, and physicist. He is one of the best poster children for the saying "knowledge is power." Lawrence Kohlberg is proof that if you work hard in school, you can reach what you want and become famous for it. Kohlberg is most famous for his stages of moral development. He devoted most of his life to this project, so when knowledge comes,effort is not far behind. Kohlberg studied boys from age seven through their adolescence and asked them moral questions and documented how the boys replied. One of his more famous questions to ask was "whether the husband of a critically ill woman is justified in stealing a drug that could save her life if the pharmacist is charging much more than he can afford to pay." Kohlberg did not look much into the answer, but the reasoning behind the answers to the questions he asked. Because he conducted his experiments like this, Kohlberg's findings were much more in depth and found to be more accurate. He had three main stages: preconventional, conventional, and postconventional. Preconvential is the easiest stage to understand. Therefore, Kohlberg's test boys were in this stage when the boys were young. This stage explains that people that are preconventional do right only when they know they will not get punished. They are typically only worried about their needs and wants, and no one else's. In this stage, people are sore afraid of punishment. In the conventional stage, Kohlberg found self pride was included in whether someone does right or wrong. People believe they are morally correct when they follow the rules and consider themselves good when they live up to what is expected of them by others. They would rather avoid blame than get a reward. The pull of society has a bigger impact on people than the law itself. The last stage is postcoventional. Most people do not reach this stage because it is morally demanding. People start to realize the law is not always right and that whether we have an award or not, we do something for the greater good. It is basically doing good and getting nothing or persecution in return. It takes a humble person to do something just for the greater good. As a society, when someone does right, we roll out the red carpet and make people feel like celebrities with accolades, and that is the main purpose why most people do good. In this stage, you would have to be a person who was self-grounded and self-controlled. Our class partook in The Linus Project and I think my whole class is conventional. I think we did it because it would look good on our transcripts and we thought we would get comments. We mostly did it because we had to for our grade. There are some chapters in the nation that are postconventional in their work and some of our class may join a chapter and devote their time and energy to The Linus Project and become postcoventional, but at this point in our lives, we are only conventional.

Quote one: findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_g2699/is_0001/ai_2699000195 - 38k -
www.bookrags.com/
biography/lawrence-kohlberg-soc/ - 27k
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biography.com/search/article.jsp?aid=9367583 - 41k
www.enotes.com/psychology-theories/
kohlberg-lawrence/biography - 12k -
www.123exp-
bio**graphies.com/t/00034114584/ - 11k